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Everything Food Gets Patent for Innovative Grocery Food Algorithm

Food and Beverages | Tuesday, August 17, 2021

When generating scores, the intricate algorithm considers three high-level indicators, each with its own lower-level subcomponents—ingredients, husbandry, and nutrition.

FREMONT, CA: Certain canned soups are better than others. But how can anyone tell if something is of higher or lower quality? Until now, careful grocery shopping needed continual label reading and a lot of mental math on the fly. That is, not anymore. Everything customers need to know about the quality of any food item is bundled into a single, unbiased, computed score with the Everything Food Quality Score (EFQS).

The EFQS was created out of need by food tech startup Everything Food when creator Peter Balsells struggled to identify and get excellent foods after a routine health check-up about his nutrition. Together with Dan Doble, a long-time friend and database expert, they created what the US Patent Office calls: Patent No. 10,942,932: system and method for grading and scoring food.

In the process, the two have accrued an enormous database of 1.5 million grocery items. Almost every type of food is included in the survey: fresh and frozen foods; canned goods; dried goods; consumer packaged goods; meats; fish; poultry; bakery; deli; confectionery; and beverages. A quality standard is created when the EFQS scores are applied across the whole supermarket business.

Find out what a high-quality Beef Barley soup looks like. Take a look at Primo Beef Barley from Primo Foods in Canada. It has an EFQS of 89. Why 89?

When generating scores, the intricate algorithm considers three high-level indicators, each with its own lower-level subcomponents: ingredients, husbandry, and nutrition. The routine is confronted with thousands of data points in this three-way intersection of data to assist in answering specific key questions:

What are the ingredients in this dish? Where did they originate? Is it natural? Is it possible that chemicals are involved? What about chemical fertilizers? What was it fed if it was an animal product? Did they have an effect on hormones? In what kind of surroundings did they live? What is the food’s nutritional performance? Is it nutritious in terms of vitamins and minerals?

“Similar to how wine scores help one easily compare the intricacies of hundreds of wines from one variety, the EverythingFood Quality Score will empower consumers to make informed food choices,” CEO Peter Balsells shares.

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