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Smart Water Technologies to Transform Wastewater Management in the Future

Olivia Smith, Utilities Tech Outlook | Wednesday, July 07, 2021

Data analytics also mean that customers, both C&I and residential, have greater control over their water use – with more accurate billing and up-to-date readings, they may contact the utility provider if they find a rise in water that may lead to leakage. This will detect leaks easier for the utility provider.

Fremont, CA: Digital water systems will innovate and push forward new solutions for the water and wastewater industries. This is according to a new IDTechEx report entitled "Digital Water Networks 2020-2030" which analyzes players, technologies and market opportunities for this new technology field.

A digital or "smart water network is a water network with additional capabilities, sensors and IoT devices that enable users to manage and operate a network more efficiently and effectively.Top Wastewater Management Solution Companies

There are many facets of the value chain that digital water can affect. According to the study, first of all there is the utilities industry. When it comes to distribution, network control and distribution pipes will simplify the management of the system. For example, data generated by smart water meters may provide patterns of consumption in real time. The response to the demand for water can be faster and thus help with the control of pressure in the network.

Moreover, low water quality may have an effect on health. Sensors can monitor a wide range of chemicals and emissions in real time. This ensures that the quality of water can be controlled across the entire water network. Finally, with new insights into data from smart networks, utilities can connect with and engage consumers in new ways.

Data analytics also mean that customers, both C&I and residential, have greater control over their water use – with more accurate billing and up-to-date readings, they may contact the utility provider if they find a rise in water that may lead to leakage. This will detect leaks easier for the utility provider.

In order to deliver these services, water utility providers need to ensure that they can continue to be versatile in their approach to future water networks and sensors as existing consumption observations and data become more common across the industry. Communications technologies and data collection are now at a stage where the needs of the water industry can be addressed.

The report offers insight into the variety of opportunities that sensors can provide providers with management and maintenance data. Most countries have water networks made up of a variety of components. There are larger pipes that make up the main network, and there are smaller distribution pipes, with larger pipes requiring different measuring mechanisms for smaller pipes. Different areas may have different pipe materials, and this may restrict measuring techniques.

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